What’s the point? Make your communications worthwhile

browningyork Communication lessons, Engagement, General communication, Inspiration, Retro post

I regularly have conversations with potential new clients who are struggling to find the time to communicate effectively. They usually have a small team with limited comms experience and they need someone to help them get their messages out effectively.

Clock with timeAlthough I haven’t yet found a way to manufacture more time (that would be a neat trick!), I can work with them to ensure they get more return on each minute they spend communicating, often by having a greater impact the first time and removing the need to duplicate their efforts.

Goodness knows, we’ve all got enough to do!
I often find myself pointing out that we’ve all got enough to do in our day-to-day jobs, without adding ‘do communication’ to our to do list. Of course, I’m not advocating that people forget about communicating all together, but rather that it’s important to make sure that you are getting some sort of return for the time and effort you put into communicating.

For this to work well, you have to integrate communication into everything you do. And there has to be a purpose to everything that aligns with the vision and strategy of your organisation. If top-notch communication is not going to deliver against the direction your organisation is going in and help you all get there, then it really shouldn’t be happening at all.

If your communication is not having an impact, then you shouldn’t be wasting your time doing it.

It comes back to our old friend, communication planning, again. Be clear from the start what is your purpose – what is the difference you want to make and why. Ask yourself:

  • What is it that I want others to be doing, thinking, feeling as a result of my communication?
  • What is the compelling meaning of my communication – what is the reason for my audience to act?
  • In short, you should always ask yourself, ‘so what?’

    As I said, we’ve all got plenty to do without adding extra tasks to our list that aren’t going to make a positive difference.

    Please get in touch if you need help working out how to make the most of the time you spend on communicating.

    Until next time

    Sarah